Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Patterns of the Past - A Simplicity Housecoat


Undated and in such bad shape that I'm afraid to take it out of the envelope, but from the hairstyles and font I'm guessing it dates from just before World War II. I wouldn't mind owning this.

9 comments:

sewducky said...

CoPA has it as 1937. And it does make a pretty dress.

Anonymous said...

They really knew how to make patterns for real women. Project Runway could learn a thing or two from this. And you would look FAB in it.

FUZZARELLY said...

I wonder how it was kept closed beneath the buttons. Hidden snaps? Or did one wear a slip underneath?

I've always loved princess seams.

sewducky said...

It has a panel underneath that goes across the front, like a wrapped skirt.

Pat aka Posh said...

I really like this.. you could step outside in it and no one would guess it was a housecoat.

Packrat said...

Such a lovely pattern. If you were really really careful, could you trace it?

Tricia said...

I have been buying vintage patterns lately. Some of them are in sad shape. I plan to put fine-weight vilene [non-iron] over the top of each pattern piece and trace it. Then I can put the vintage pieces away and use the vilene to cut my fabric.

This is the method I use for Burda magazine patterns. All of the patterns are on two sheets of paper, and you have to trace the pieces you want.

I love this pattern.

Shay said...

I could probably trace it...isn't it funny that this is a nicer outfit than most of my neighbors wear to church?

Lady Anne said...

I'm reading backwards through your blog, so my remarks are all out of sequence. Anyway, use a piece of scrap first, but I do remember learning in school that you could iron your patterns to a cleaners bag to make them last longer.

Also, use a hole punch to mark the dots, and then either mark the fabric with a washable marker or - back in the "olde" days - use powdered chalk/ That way, you don't have to mess up the patterns with a pin wheel and dressmaker's carbon.