Wednesday, June 17, 2009

Patterns of the Past-1916 Wardrobe


These patterns were advertised in Needlecraft magazine, December 1916. From right to left, you have a dressing gown and rather natty nightgown, housedress, apron, and an afternoon dress for church, club meetings, informal social events such as teas, and making or receiving calls. Note the short, wide "war crinoline" silhouette, which appeared suddenly in the spring of 1915 as a radical departure from straight, floor-length Edwardian styles. It was denounced in press and pulpit as wasteful and shocking. Although hemlines briefly dropped again in the early 20's, this was the beginning of the end so far as wardrobe moralists were concerned.

6 comments:

FUZZARELLY said...

I just love how the press and pulpit railed against these fashions. Wasteful and Shocking!

I find the outfits charming and comfortable looking. Corseting on the way out.

sewducky said...

These never really went out of style, just difference in fits really.

Darla: Retro Ways said...

Such a great history lesson, I think the apron and day dress are so gorgeous. ♥

Shay said...

I wouldn't want to do my housework in that but I think the housedress is as Ducky said, a very classic, wearable style.

But of all these I like the nightie; I think that would make a very dapper pajama top, with the frogs and the binding.

Henya said...

Those look so good. "The press and the pulpit" should have taken a look at the tube tops, can you imagine?

Packrat said...

I would love that apron. Or maybe several of them. Good classic styles.